THE BENEFITS OF MULTIVITAMIN SUPPLEMENTS TO YOUR EYESIGHT

Dr. Sandy T. Feldman Encourages Patients to Take Their Vitamins for Good Eye Health

 

SAN DIEGO (July 29, 2014) – While most people understand that vitamins can help to fill in the nutritional gaps in one’s diet, or help to prevent deficiencies that can lead to a chronic condition, they may not be aware of the effect that vitamins can have on eyesight. Research conducted by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) reveals that certain nutrients, such as beta carotene and Vitamins A and C, can actually help to reduce the progression of certain eye-related conditions such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

“As the debate continues on whether or not vitamin supplements have an effect on eye health, this research clearly confirms the benefits of multivitamins in helping to stave off some of the most common eye conditions such as dry eyes, AMD, and cataracts,” says Dr. Feldman. “Simple things such as eating certain fruits and vegetables, which contain nutrients that optimize one’s eye health, can go a long way in ensuring good vision for the long term.”

In a recent study published in the journal Ophthalmology,1 it was found that consistently taking multivitamin supplements can help to decrease the risk of cataracts and AMD, most especially in men. The study found that there was a 9 percent decrease in cataracts in individuals who took supplements, and a 13 percent decrease in nuclear cataract, which is the most prevalent type of cataract associated with the aging process. With nearly 10 million American adults suffering from cataracts, even a 9 percent decrease could have a significant impact on this public health issue.

In order to help give eyesight a boost, Dr. Feldman recommends incorporating the following nutrients into one’s diet. As with all medications and supplements, it is a good idea to speak with your eye doctor first:

Beta-carotene – Naturally present in foods such as carrots, kale, and sweet potatoes, beta- carotene helps protect against conditions such as dry-eye syndrome and night blindness, and can also help to slow the progression of AMD.

Lutein – Found in foods such as mangoes, broccoli, and yellow peppers, lutein helps to prevent cataracts and AMD and also protects the retina from bright and harsh light.

Omega-3 Fatty Acids – Omega-3 fatty acids, most commonly found in fish, can help to combat dry-eye syndrome, a condition that occurs when the eyes are unable to produce enough tears for lubrication.

Vitamins A, C and E – These three vitamins provide several benefits to the eyes. Vitamin A, found in milk and eggs, can help strengthen the retina. Found in oranges, strawberries, and kale, Vitamin C can help slow the development of AMD and glaucoma, while Vitamin E, found in almonds, can also help to slow the development of AMD.

Zinc – Found in meats such as turkey or beef, zinc may help slow the progression of AMD and help decrease the risk of night blindness.

About Dr. Sandy T. Feldman

As a leader in the field of ophthalmology, Dr. Sandy T. Feldman has participated in FDA clinical studies of custom LASIK. Currently, she is involved in studies of a new treatment to halt the progression of keratoconus, a disease in which the fitting of contact lenses can become challenging. In 2009, she was one of ten laser eye care providers in the U.S. to receive the Goldline Award as seen Forbes Magazine. In 2010, she was awarded the Silver Elite RealSelf award, and in 2011, she was awarded Top Doc San Diego, inducted into the prestigious American College of Ophthalmic Surgeons and was one of nation’s 15 leading laser eye surgeons as seen in Newsweek magazine. In 2013, Clearview Eye & Laser Medical Center was voted best LASIK center in San Diego by CityBeat Magazine. Dr. Feldman is a member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery.

Clearview Eye and Laser Medical Center
6255 Lusk Blvd, Suite 100, San Diego, CA 92121
858.452.3937
www.clearvieweyes.com





1 Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS)